Hunt County Historical Commission

 

Official Texas
Historical
Markers in Hunt County

Greenville Markers

Bourland-Stevens-Samuel House
Camp House
Mrs. Lallie P. Briscoe Carlisle
Central Christian Church
Ende-Gaillard House

First Baptist Church
Germany House

Grace Presbyterian Church
City of Greenville
Greenville Cotton Compress

Greenville Electric Light Plant
Greenville Exchange Bank

Greenville Herald
Greenville Post Office
Greenville Savings & Loan
General Hal C. Horton House
Hunt County
Hunt County Courthouse
Hunt County's First Railroad
Hunt County's Seven Courthouses
"Katy" Depot
Kavanaugh United Methodist Church
Library Movement in Greenville
Majors Field

Captain Ben D. Martin
Phillips Field/Majors Stadium
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
John L. Southall
Texas Holiness University
Wesley College
Wesley United Methodist Church

Commerce Markers

Centennial of Methodism in Commerce
General Claire Chennault Birthplace
City of Commerce
Commerce Churches
Commerce Post Office
Early Public Schools
East Texas State University
First Baptist Church
First Christian Church
First Presbyterian Church
Josiah Hart Jackson
Jernigin's Store
Lebanon Cemetery
Mayo Hall
President's House (Heritage House)
Bruce Williams American Legion Post #1

Hunt County Markers

Caney Cemetery
Central National Road
Clinton Cemetery
Colony Line Road
Concord Baptist Church
First Baptist Church of Celeste
First Methodist Church of Lone Oak
Fourth Sunday Singing Society
Graham Point Cemetery
Harrell Camp Ground
Mack Harrell Birthplace
Henry & Emerson College
Judge James Hooker
Humboldt Cemetery
I.O.O.F. Cemetery
Kingston Baptist Church

Lake Tawakoni
William Lane
Lone Oak Baptist Church
Merit Methodist Church
Mt. Carmel Cemetery
Audie Murphy Birthplace
Audie Murphy Home Town
National Road Crossing
City of Quinlan
Town of Roberts
Sabine River Headwaters
Scatter Branch Church
Shady Grove Community
Sonora Cemetery
St. Paul School
Stewart Cemetery
Thomas N. Waul Home (Cherry Hill)
Captain Henry W. Wade
White Rock Baptist Church
White Rock Community
White Rock Methodist Church
Wolfe's Mill Site

 

markers are listed in order of placement date within each section
click on title to view marker inscription
(note: some types of markers do not have inscriptions)

Greenville Markers

Hunt County
Created April 11, 1846, organized July 13, 1846. Named for General Memucan Hunt, Minister to the United States for the Texas Republic.
(1936 Texas Centennial Marker)
Southwest corner of courthouse lawn, Stonewall and Washington Streets

Mrs. Lallie P. Briscoe Carlisle
Fist woman to hold an elective public office in Texas; Hunt County Clerk, 1902.
(1965 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in East Mount Cemetery

Greenville Electric Light Plant
First municipally-owned electric plant in Texas; built in 1891.
(1965 Texas Historical Marker)
Marker in lobby of steam turbine plant, 3/10 mile east of US Hwy 69 N

St. Paul's Episcopal Church
Oldest church building in Greenville at time of marker placement. Original building at 3215 Stonewall Street has been razed.
(1966 Texas Historical Marker)
Marker presently in new church building, FM 1570

Captain Ben D. Martin
Civil War captain and early mayor of Greenville.
(1968 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in East Mount Cemetery

John L. Southall
Peace officer killed in line of duty.
(1968 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in East Mount Cemetery

Bourland-Stevens-Samuel House
Erected in 1883 using part of Stevens' house built in 1854.
(1969 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark)
1916 Stonewall Street

General Hal C. Horton House
Erected in 1885; first two-story solid brick house in Greenville.
(1969 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark)
3925 Moulton Street

Greenville Herald
Oldest existing business institution in Hunt County; founded 1869.
(1969 Texas Historical Marker)
2305 King Street

The Greenville Cotton Compress
Once the world's largest inland press and holder of world's record for number of bales pressed in a 10-hour day (2,073 bales).
(1971 Texas Historical Marker)
1409 Lee Street

Wesley College
Methodist junior college started in 1905 in Terrell; moved to Greenville in 1912; closed in 1938. Administration building burned in 2002.
(1971 Texas Historical Marker)
6000 Sayle Street

The First Railroad in Hunt County
Missouri, Kansas & Texas (M.K.T.) Depot where first train arrived on October 1, 1880.
(1972 Texas Historical Marker)
3102 Lee Street

First Baptist Church
Congregation formed in 1858 with 19 charter members.
(1973 Texas Historical Marker)
2703 Wesley Street

Site of Texas Holiness University - Peniel
Founded 1899.
(1974 Texas Historical Marker)
1009 Rees Street (US Hwy 69) Peniel

The Old Greenville Post Office
Official Hunt County postal system established in 1847; Neo-Classical building erected in 1910. Audie Murphy enlisted in the Army here.
(1975 Texas Historical Marker, National Register)
3716 Lee Street

Seven Courthouses of Hunt County
First one, a log cabin, was built in 1847. Present courthouse, the seventh, was dedicated on April 11, 1929.
(1982 Texas Historical Marker)
Northwest corner of courthouse lawn, Stonewall and Lee Streets

Wesley United Methodist Church
Organized in 1850; early worship services held under twin oaks at Bourland and St. John Streets and in county courthouse.
(1984 Texas Historical Marker)
5302 US Hwy 69 S

Greenville Building & Loan
Second oldest savings institution in Texas when marked; later closed.
(1986 Texas Historical Marker)
2900 Lee Street

Camp House
A Classical Revival home built in 1914.
(1987 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, National Register)
2620 Church Street

Central Christian Church
Congregation organized in 1879. Present Gothic Revival building with towers and art glass windows completed in 1899.
(1989 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, National Register)
2611 Wesley Street

Grace Presbyterian Church
Congregation organized as Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1863. Original building across from present Municipal Building on Washington Street. Name changed in 1908. Present structure, with Cecil Casebier art glass windows, built in 1966.
(1993 Texas Historical Marker)
1914 Joe Ramsey Boulevard

Majors Field
World War II Army Air Corps training base. Named for first Hunt County war fatality, Truett Majors. Now Greenville Municipal Airport.
(1995 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 2101 south of FM 1570

Hunt County Courthouse
Classical Revival to Art Deco transitional architecture. Dedicated April 11, 1929 on 83rd anniversary of county creation. Centered in public square in original town site.
(1995 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, National Register)
Northwest corner of courthouse lawn, Stonewall and Lee Streets

Kavanaugh United Methodist Church
Founded as a mission Sunday School in 1892. Present building dedicated in 1924.
(1995 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark)

"Katy" Depot
Victorian eclectic depot built in 1896. Served as passenger station until 1965.
(1997 National Register)
3102 Lee Street

Germany House
Simplified Second Empire home built in 1886 for merchant and civic leader Joseph Germany.
(1999 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark)
3403 Lee Street

City of Greenville
Named for Texas War for Independence veteran Thomas J. Green, Greenville was founded as Hunt County seat, first platted in 1846. Final transfer of deed for townsite donation by McQuinney Howell Wright in 1850.
(2001 Texas Historical Marker)
Municipal Building, 2821 Washington Street

Library Movement in Greenville
Started by Women's Review Club in 1897. Became City supported public library housed in Carnegie Library building until 1954. Current building occupied in 1996. Named for local historian W. Walworth Harrison.
(2002 Texas Historical Marker)

W. Walworth Harrison Public Library, #1 Lou Finney Lane

Ende-Gaillard House
The oldest house in Greenville, the Ende-Gaillard house was built by Fred Ende for wife, Amelia. Later owned by the Ende's daughter Louise and husband, Dr. David Gaillard. House moved to Graham Park from original site to avoid demolition, later moved to American Cotton Museum grounds.
(2002 Texas Historical Marker)
Audie Murphy/American Cotton Museum, Paul Mathews Blvd., IH-30 at Exit 95

Greenville Exchange Bank
Greenville's first bank, moved to this site in 1927. Bank building housed professional offices. Closed in 1985. The building reopened as government offices after renovation completed in 2003. Renamed Paul Mathews Exchange Building for former bank president on the occasion of Mathews 100th birthday on January 3, 2004.
(2003 Hunt County Local History Marker)
SW corner Stonewall & Lee Streets

Phillips Field/Majors Stadium
Site of Greenville High School's first football field, later a minor league baseball stadium where the Greenville Majors beat the New York Yankees in an exhibition game.
(2003 Texas Historical Marker)
Houston Street between Jordan & Henry Streets

Commerce Markers

Josiah Hart Jackson
Founder of Cow Hill, forerunner of Commerce.
(1967 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in Rosemound Cemetery

East Texas State University
Founded as Mayo School in 1894; Sam Rayburn is most famous alumnus. Became Texas A & M University-Commerce in 1996.
(1967 Texas Historical Marker)
SH 50 at West entrance to campus

Birthplace of General Claire Chennault
Leader of famous "Flying Tigers" of China in World War II.
(1968 Texas Historical Marker)
1501 Monroe Street

Centennial of Methodism in Commerce
An 1881 union of Mt. Zion and Lebanon congregations began Methodism's active participation in community development.
(1981 Texas Historical Marker)

American Legion Bruce B. Williams Post #1
First American Legion Post in Texas; established in 1919; named for first Commerce serviceman killed in World War I.
(1982 Texas Historical Marker)

Jernigin's Store
Site of early mercantile store owned by William Jernigin, responsible for naming city of Commerce.
(1982 Texas Historical Marker)
1210 Park Street

First Baptist Church
Organized in 1883; present building constructed in 1913.
(1983 Texas Historical Marker)
Washington and Sycamore Streets

City of Commerce
Incorporated in 1885; settlement began in 1853 as a village called Cow Hill.
(1985 Texas Historical Marker)
Main Street on the square

First Christian Church
First services held during the 1850s.
(1985 Texas Historical Marker)
Park and Sycamore Streets

Early Public Schools
A school has been located on site since 1883 when the first public school opened.
(1986 Texas Historical Marker)
1600 Church Street

First Presbyterian Church
Congregation formed in 1888; present building constructed in 1913.
(1988 Texas Historical Marker)
1428 Caddo Street

Commerce Post Office
Georgian Revival building served as U.S. Post Office 1918-71; Commerce Public Library since 1972.
(1991 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark)
1210 Park Street

Lebanon Cemetery
Began in early 1860s; site of a school, church and cemetery by 1871. Only the cemetery remains.
(1991 Texas Historical Marker)
M.L. King Street, .6 miles east of city limits

Commerce Churches
Site of 1893 Missionary Baptist Church; home to five different churches since 1893. Trinity Lutheran Church worships in original structure and 1924 addition.
(1995 Texas Historical Marker)
1502 Monroe Street

President's House (Heritage House)
Home of three ETSU presidents from 1929 to 1967. Site of receptions hosting visiting celebrities and campus museum.
(1997 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, National Register)
Texas A & M University-Commerce campus, Social Sciences Oval

Mayo Hall (history)
1936 men's dormitory, home to winning athletic teams, also housed army trainees during WW II. Building remains unchanged since construction.
(National Register)
Texas A & M University-Commerce campus, corner Monroe & Stonewall Sts.


Hunt County Markers

Central National Road
Built by the Republic of Texas in 1844 from Red River to present Dallas.
(Private, state-approved DAR Marker)
US Hwy 69 at FM 2194, Kellogg

Home of Thomas N. Waul (Cherry Hill)
Leader of Waul's Texas Legion in Confederate Army.
(1963 Civil War Marker)
County road south of FM 2736, east of Greenville

William Lane
First Anglo-American born in Hunt County.
(1965 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in Bethel Cemetery, ¼ mile east of SH 34

Harrell Camp Ground
Early Methodist camp meeting ground established 1850 by Richard Harrell.
(1966 Texas Historical Marker)
US hwy 69 at Cow Leach Fork of Sabine River, ½ mile north of Kingston

Judge James Hooker
Prominent pioneer; one of five Town Commissioners named in legislative act creating Hunt County.
(1966 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in Hooker Ridge Cemetery, FM 513, 5 miles south of Lone Oak

Scatter Branch Church
Unusual joint operation of Methodists and Baptists; late 1800s.
(1967 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 2874, 2.6 miles north of Neylandville

Old National Road Crossing
Marks first crossing of South Sulphur River by Central National Road built by the Republic of Texas in 1844.
(1967 Texas Historical Marker)
SH 34, 3 miles south of Wolfe City

Concord Baptist Church
Organized in 1844, oldest institution in Hunt County.
(1967 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 118, 6 miles northeast of Greenville in Jacobia

Fourth Sunday Singing Society
A monthly musical "convention" founded in 1885 or 1890 by Scatterbranch Church members.
(1968 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 2874, 2.6 miles north of Neylandville

Henry/Emerson College
Senior college founded in 1892; renamed Emerson College in 1903 for poet Ralph Waldo Emerson.
(1968 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 513, Campbell

The Colony Line Road
Followed north line of Mercer's Colony (present Washington Street) through Greenville in pioneer days.
(1968 Texas Historical Marker)
US Hwy 380, 5 miles west of county courthouse

Lake Tawakoni
Impounded for water supply and recreation in 1960 by Sabine River Authority. Boasts Texas' Longest Inland Bridge.
(1970 Texas Historical Marker)
SH 35, marker at west end of causeway

Lone Oak Baptist Church
Organized in 1858. Present building is congregation's third building at this site.
(1970, modified 1982 Texas Historical Marker)
McBride and Olive Streets, Lone Oak

Merit Methodist Church
Organized in 1871. Early services held in Merit School. At time of marker placement, congregation still included descendents of original members.
(1971 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 36 in Merit

Captain Henry W. Wade
Civil War cavalry captain in Confederate Army; served as a delegate from Hunt County to Constitutional Convention framing present Texas Constitution in 1875; grandfather of noted Dallas District Attorney Henry Wade.
(1971 Texas Historical Grave Marker)
Gravesite in Wade Cemetery, SH 34, Quinlan

Site of Wolfe's Mill
Forerunner of present Wolfe City; settlement grew up around grist mill built by Lemuel Wolfe.
(1971 Texas Historical Marker)
402 South Mill Street, Wolfe City

Headwaters of Sabine River
Origin of Cow Leach Fork, named for Indian chief in residence at the time settlers arrived.
(1971 Texas Historical Marker)
US Hwy 69, 2 miles northwest of Celeste

Birthplace of Audie Murphy
Most decorated combat soldier of World War II.
(1973 Texas Historical Marker)
US Hwy 69, 1½ miles south of Kingston

Home Town of Audie Murphy
Murphy lived in Celeste during his youth.
(1973 Texas Historical Marker)
US Hwy 69, at east edge of Celeste

Mt. Carmel Cemetery
Established early 1850s on 4 acres purchased by George Williams. First burial in 1852.
(1975 Texas Historical Marker)
SH 11, .7 miles southeast of Wolfe City

Sonora Cemetery
Established 1872; encompassed 7 acres by 1880; still in use.
(1983 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 1563 at community road, Fairlie

White Rock Community
Originally named Tidwell Creek, it was a stop on the Sherman-Jefferson Trail.
(1986 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 1566, 1 mile west of SH 34, White Rock

White Rock Baptist Church
Organized in 1872 as Pleasant View Baptist Church; moved to White Rock in 1901; present structure built in 1925.
(1986 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 1566, 1 mile west of SH 34, White Rock

White Rock Methodist Church
Organized in 1880, the congregation met in schoolhouse until 1889. Present building replaced earlier one destroyed by 1907 storm.
(1986 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 1566, 1 mile west of SH 34, White Rock

Birthplace of Mack Harrell
Metropolitan Opera star who established Aspen Music Festival.
(1987 Texas Historical Marker)
606 Sanger, Celeste

First Baptist Church of Celeste
Organized in 1887 with the founding of the town.
(1988 Texas Historical Marker)
Corner of Third and Cockrell Streets, Celeste

Lone Oak Methodist Church
Congregation formed in 1854; present building completed in 1889.
(1988 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark)
Main Street, 2 blocks west of US 69, Lone Oak

St. Paul School
Begun at St. Paul Baptist Church, the school became a major educational center for African Americans throughout the area; absorbed by Commerce ISD in 1965.
(1989 Texas Historical Marker)
City Hall, Neylandville

City of Quinlan
Settled 1892 as stop on Texas Midland Railroad; incorporated 1896.
(1995 Texas Historical Marker)
Main Street at City Hall Quinlan

Graham Point Cemetery
Pioneer cemetery established ca. 1860. Served Graham Point and Union Valley for more than 100 years.
(1996 Texas Historical Marker)
CR 2317, Graham Point

Kingston Baptist Church
Organized in 1880 when town was created along MKT Railroad.
(1996 Texas Historical Marker)
US 69 at FM 3427, Kingston

Town of Roberts
Founded in 1882 as a stop on Houston and Texas Central Railroad; station removed in 1894. Town destroyed by fire in 1895.
(1998 Texas Historical Marker)
SH 34 at Bus 34, Quinlan

Caney Cemetery
Established 1904 on donated land including former family burial plot dating to 1895. Some original Bois D'Arc markers remain.
(1998 Texas Historical Marker)
CR 3107 south of Campbell

Clinton Cemetery
Established 1850s in Massayville, later renamed Clinton for Cotton Belt Railway official. Earliest burial 1859.
(1998 Texas Historical Marker)
CR 2720, 3.4 miles north of Caddo Mills

Stewart Cemetery
Early pioneer cemetery. Earliest legible marker dated 1863. Includes graves of State Rep. Louis Lankford, several Confederate veterans.
(1999 Texas Historical Marker, Texas Historic Cemetery)
FM 1568, 2 miles south of Commerce

Shady Grove Community
Founded in the final days of the Civil War, school and community were named for the large group of shade trees on site.
(1999 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 499, 7½ miles east of Greenville

Humboldt Cemetery
Founded on land donated for church and cemetery in 1890. Earliest grave dates to 1876.
(2000 Texas Historical Marker)
FM 2736, 9 miles northeast of Greenville

Lee Cemetery
Established
about 1860.
(2000 Historic Texas Cemetery Marker)
Hwy. 78 south from Leonard, left on Fannin CR 5065 to intersection of Hunt CR 1139 & 1137, right on CR 1137 1.5 miles

I.O.O.F. Cemetery
Caddo Mills I.O.O.F. Lodge purchased burial ground for use as cemetery in 1902. Earliest recorded burial in 1893.
(2001 Texas Historical Marker)
1 mile south of Caddo Mills on Hwy. 66, 1 mile west on Hwy. 6

 

 

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Copyright 2001-
Hunt County Historical Commission
Carol Taylor, Chair
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